Statistics 992: Topics in high dimensional statistical inference

 

Michael Newton (newton@stat.wisc.edu)

 

Spring 2006, MW 2:30 – 3:45, MSC 5295

 

Overview: A traditional model in statistics entails observations sampled from a fixed, possibly complicated, population.  Inference about parameters describing this population is based on approximations in which the number of parameters does not increase with the sample size.  Often the context prescribes a different model, in which parameter dimension is tied to sample size.  By reviewing early and contemporary literature, we will study a range of topics related to parameter-rich statistics.  In Part I, we will review the classical view, some difficulties that arise, connections between frequentist and Bayesian perspectives, and empirical Bayesian methodology.  In Part II, we will study Bayesian methodology, considering both parametric and nonparametric hierarchical models, and we will review computational approaches to model fitting.  Part III concerns recent advances, including new techniques for high-dimensional testing and estimation.

 

Part I:  On the origins of empirical Bayes

 

Cramer, H. (1946). Mathematical methods of statistics, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

 

J. Neyman and E.L. Scott (1948). Consistent estimates based on partially consistent observations. Econometrika (16), 1-32.

 

A. Wald (1949). Note on the consistency of the maximum likelihood estimate.  Annals of Mathematical Statistics (20), 595-601.

 

J. Wolfowitz (1949). On Wald's proof of the consistency of the maximum likelihood estimator.  Annals of Mathematical Statistics (20), 601-602.

 

C. Stein (1955). Inadmissibility of the usual estimator for the mean of a multivariate normal distribution.  Proceedings of the Third Berkeley Symposium, Vol 1, Berkeley: University of California Press, 197-206.

 

J. Kiefer and J. Wolfowitz (1956). Consistency of the maximum likelihood estimates in the presence of infinitely many nuisance parameters.  Annals of Mathematical Statistics (27), 887-906.

 

W. James and C. Stein (1961). Estimation with quadratic loss. Proceedings of the Fourth Berkeley Symposium, Vol 1, Berkeley: University of California Press, 351-379.

 

B. Efron and C.N. Morris (1971). Limiting the risk of Bayes and empirical Bayes estimators -- Part I: The Bayes case. J. Amer. Statist. Assoc. (66), 807-815.

 

B. Efron and C.N. Morris (1972a). Limiting the risk of Bayes and empirical Bayes estimators -- Part II: The empirical Bayes case. J. Amer. Statis. Assoc. (67), 130-139.

 

B. Efron and C.N. Morris (1972b). Empirical Bayes on vector observations: An extension of Stein's method. Biometrika (59), 335-347.

 

B. Efron and C.N. Morris (1973a). Stein's estimation rule and its competitors -- an empirical Bayes approach. J. Amer. Statist. Assoc.  (68), 117-130.

 

B. Efron and C.N. Morris (1973b). Combining possibly related estimation problems (with discussion). J. Roy. Statist. Soc. Series B. (35), 379-421.

 

B. Efron (1986). Why isn't everyone a Bayesian? (with discussion [d1, d2, d3, d4, d5, reply]) American Statistician, (40) 1-11.

 

B.P. Carlin and T.A. Louis (2000). Empirical Bayes: Past, present and future. J. Amer. Statist. Assoc., (95), 1286-1289.